Singapore Design Week/ Workshop

As part of Singapore Design Week, Heist ran a workshop on design sprints. We shared tips and tricks on using principles of ethnography when you're short on time and budget. And what it takes to set up and run a successful sprint. Our teams worked on social innovation challenges, going from key insights to design principles.. And then creative concepts to business and tech validation in the space of a few hours. 

Big thanks to everyone who joined us early on a Monday morning. We will continue to run design thinking, design sprints and ethnography training sessions - partnering with the likes of SUTD, NUS as well as our clients and design partners. Drop us a line if you'd like to join us!

We're big believers in collaboration and open source learning. As promised, slides shared below. 

Oh also, several of the photographs in our deck were shot by one of our favourite photographers (and fellow coffee addict) Kismet. You can see more of her beautiful work here

Singapore Design Week

Come join us at the National Design Centre on March 6th. Heist will be running a workshop on design sprints. We will talk about looking for sharp insights, using them to develop creative concepts and then quickly test them using rapid prototyping. We will use a series of ideation exercises and design thinking tools to quickly take us from insights to concepts we can test.

When: 6th March 2017 / 9:30 AM - 12 PM 

Where: National Design Centre, Auditorium

Sign up to join us!

Advice we like

"The advice I like to give young artists, or really anybody who’ll listen to me, is not to wait around for inspiration. Inspiration is for amateurs; the rest of us just show up and get to work. If you wait around for the clouds to part and a bolt of lightning to strike you in the brain, you are not going to make an awful lot of work. All the best ideas come out of the process; they come out of the work itself… Inspiration is absolutely unnecessary and somehow deceptive. You feel like you need this great idea before you can get down to work, and I find that’s almost never the case."

Chuck Close